Rkatseteli

Aleqsi Tsikhelishvili

No one ever showed Aleqsi how to make wine. Although Aleqsi's father had made wine, he died when Aleqsi was a child, and so he had to teach himself.
Aleqsi wanted to produce wine and in 1996 he got 2ha land from the government. In 2010 he started selling his wines abroad.
Today Aleqsi owns 7 big Qvevri in which he produces 3 different cuvées from 3 different grapes: Jghia, Mtsvane and Rkatseteli.
He produces all of his wine completly organically and from old Georgian traditions, only using bordeaux- and nettle solutions

 

GoGo Wine

Ketevan, The daughter of winemaker Kakha Berishvili, made her first vintage in the family cellar in 2015 under the name GOGO wines.
The small family vineyards are located in the Naprauli zone in the Kakheti region of Georgia.
The grapes are farmed entirely with the use of biodynamic preparates and transported by horse from the vineyards to the cellar.
Ketevan’s first vintage is a juicy rosé made with the local grape varieties of Rkatsiteli and Saperavi.

Do RE MI

Do RE MI was founded in 2013 by three friends: Giorgi, Mamuka and Gabriel. Their goal is to create the finest organic wines using ancient Georgian techniques. The marani (winery) is located just outside of Tbilisi, in the Samegrelo region of Georgia. Here they produce wines from grapes grown in organic vineyards in many different regions of Georgia. The wines are made without any industrial yeast or additives, and fermented and aged in Qvevri, which are traditional clay pots used in Georgia. Gaumarjos!

Our Wine

Soliko Tsaishivili has been producing wine in the Bakurtsikhe Gurjaani district of Kakheti since 2005.
Soliko believes that if you want to drink good wine, you need to produce it yourself. So that’s exactly what he does.
He makes wine according to ancient Georgian tradition, which means that all of his wines are fermented and aged in Qvevri, big clay vessels buried under ground. His big 2000L Qvevries are kept in his basement, which he dug out himself.
Soliko’s wines are alive, constantly changing, and some of the most authentic Georgian wine you will come across.

Pheasant´s Tears

Two of the main catalysts of the modern Georgian wine movement, John Wurdeman and Gela Patalishvili, joined forces in the most unusual, but serendipitous way. John, an American painter had moved to Georgia after falling in love with the spirit of the land whilst travelling from Moscow. He took a job painting the fences at a local vineyard when he was approached by a Gela, a 7th generation vigneron, who was convinced John was the man to help bring the traditional style of Georgian wine to the world. John was hesistant, but Gela persisted.